National Drought Mitigation Center
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National Drought Mitigation Center
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Drought-affected trees dying in Alabama
5/10/2017 12:00:00 AM



CATEGORIES:
Plants & Wildlife
Society & Public Health
AFFECTED AREAS:
Alabama
Autauga County, AL
Baldwin County, AL
Barbour County, AL
Bibb County, AL
Blount County, AL
Bullock County, AL
Butler County, AL
Calhoun County, AL
Chambers County, AL
Cherokee County, AL
Chilton County, AL
Choctaw County, AL
Clarke County, AL
Clay County, AL
Cleburne County, AL
Coffee County, AL
Colbert County, AL
Conecuh County, AL
Coosa County, AL
Covington County, AL
Crenshaw County, AL
Cullman County, AL
Dale County, AL
Dallas County, AL
DeKalb County, AL
Elmore County, AL
Escambia County, AL
Etowah County, AL
Fayette County, AL
Franklin County, AL
Geneva County, AL
Greene County, AL
Hale County, AL
Henry County, AL
Houston County, AL
Jackson County, AL
Jefferson County, AL
Lamar County, AL
Lauderdale County, AL
Lawrence County, AL
Lee County, AL
Limestone County, AL
Lowndes County, AL
Macon County, AL
Madison County, AL
Marengo County, AL
Marion County, AL
Marshall County, AL
Mobile County, AL
Monroe County, AL
Montgomery County, AL
Morgan County, AL
Perry County, AL
Pickens County, AL
Pike County, AL
Randolph County, AL
Russell County, AL
Saint Clair County, AL
Shelby County, AL
Sumter County, AL
Talladega County, AL
Tallapoosa County, AL
Tuscaloosa County, AL
Walker County, AL
Washington County, AL
Wilcox County, AL
Winston County, AL

Start Date: 2/13/2017 - End Date: 5/10/2017
Many trees in central Alabama were not showing signs of life as spring unfolded, indicating that drought killed many thousands of trees. The majority of damage occurred in evergreen species, according to Dana Stone, a forester with the Alabama Forestry Commission. Pines, Leland cypress, Japanese cypress, cedars, magnolias and even oak trees were the most affected, stated Stone. A number of pests were attacking the trees, including Southern pine beetle, Ips engraver beetle, black turpentine beetle and the deodar weevil, or a combination of those insects. Huntsville Times (Ala.), May 10, 2017 Alabama trees continued to die, despite rainfall in December and January, said the Alabama Forestry Commission. The reason for the trees deaths was not clear, but the losses may be significant. The AFC began receiving calls about pine trees of all ages and sizes dying, ranging from seedlings to mature trees. Needles frequently turn brown, as do the pitch tubes, indicating bark beetle infestation. Inspections of the dying trees revealed a variety of pests, including Southern pine beetle, Ips engraver beetle, and black turpentine beetle, or a combination of all three. In some cases, the deodar weevil was also present too. Landowners need to monitor the health of their trees and contact the AFC or registered forester before taking action against insect activity. State of Alabama (Montgomery, Ala.), Feb. 13, 2017 and Jasper Daily Mountain Eagle (Ala.), March 19, 2017
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